CrossFit Doesn’t Have a Dirty Little Secret — You’re Just Irresponsible

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Photo from my trip to the Crossfit Games this year

*Since I wrote this piece in about 20 minutes on my lunch break today, I’ve gone back to make a couple of light edits. 3:45 p.m.*

– Follow Ericka on Twitter & Instagram
– Best Box EVER: This one! 
*My time at The 2013 Crossfit Games

I saw multiple people sharing this article“CrossfFt’s Dirty Little Secret” — over the weekend. As soon as I saw, I clicked over to see what the latest Crossfit hater-ade was.

I keep running into articles designed to dis CrossFit — but I don’t get why there is so much more  bitterness for CrossFit over any other sport. The authors of these pieces always have some kind of personal problem with people who do CrossFit but the core of it is a mystery.

CrossFit doesn’t have a dirty little secret – what you see is what you get.

This article discusses a rare condition called “Rhabdomyolysis” — where one’s muscles basically “explode” from extreme overworking. Simply put — you push push push when you shouldn’t and cause potentially permanent damage.

The way the author frames this article, though, you’d think people were dying from CrossFit on a regular basis.

I’m not going to summarize the whole article — read it for yourself. But here’s why it makes me mad…

Making Me Mad


Rhabdomyolysis — an extreme condition thwarted upon oneself – is not the fault of CrossFit. It’s not the sport, the organization or even the coaches. It’s your own fault.

People like to talk about CrossFit like it’s literally Navy SEAL training with drill sergeants screaming in your face.

Not at all. It’s actually more like people encouraging you do to do your best and yes — push yourself — because isn’t it great to have that extra motivation? It’s a positive space for you to work hard and feel good about yourself.

But use your common sense! Don’t do something that will hurt yourself. Listen to your body. Go slowly when you start. Learn correct form. Don’t lift too heavy. Scale down if you need to. Take it seriously — weightlifting isn’t a joke.

Any good CrossFit coach will tell you these things. Of course, there are bad coaches! There are bad gyms. There are people who will tell you to do things that may be harmful. Be smart.

This is when you use your brain. Hey, maybe working out until I vomit is not a good idea! Personally, I’ve never worked out until I vomited (almost after a marathon once but hey…)

My Experience

I’ve been doing CrossFit for nearly two years and have no problem stopping to take a few breaths when I need to, switching to knee push ups if real ones get too hard, going to grab a drink of water mid-workout. A couple of times, I’ve felt fatigued and sat down for a moment — and GASP! — no one told me I was weak or ridiculed me for doing what I needed to do for me.

Another part of this article that irritated me, he talks about women peeing during double unders and says, “No, peeing during a workout is not alright. Ever.”

First of all, marathoners and triathletes do this regularly. Secondly, if you know anything about double unders, you DO have to empty your bladder out completely before you do them!  Bouncing up and down like that does somethin’ to ya and guess what? It’s not “extreme exercise.” The author calls it “stress-induced urinary incontinence.” Nope, definitely not stressful to do double unders. I love double unders — I just make sure I pee before I do them. Ain’t no thang.

**UPDATE: A ton of people have responded to this “peeing issue.” I get that “stress-induced” doesn’t not mean actual stress in the traditional sense. I get that urinary incontinence is a real thing. This piece is not a scientific study and some things are some in sarcasm as well. And to clarify, I do NOT pee on myself as some have accused. I do make sure to pee before I workout in case I feel uncomfortable. Part of blogging is honesty and that’s what you get with me.

What It Comes Down To


CrossFit haters like to blame CrossFit as a whole — call it a cult, label people are “weird,” or “obsessed.” Folks will say CrossFit causes injury and is irresponsible. Newsflash: CrossFit does not cause injury — individuals do things that cause themselves injury.

This is what it comes down to: personal responsibility. I don’t expect my CrossFit coaches to do everything for me. I have to take the responsibility to learn moves correctly and take things slowly. I have to listen to my body and not cave to some kind of “zombie pressure” to keep going when I shouldn’t.

My back is hurt right now and why? Because I did something incorrectly and that’s my fault. I went too big on a weight and that’s my fault. I wasn’t careful — that’s MY fault. That could have happened to me working out in Gold’s Gym by myself.

Anyway, haters, stop blaming CrossFit for your problems and take some responsibility for your bad decisions.

**UPDATE: CrossFit is with me :)

 

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/16100991571183223371 Rachel

    Oh thank you for writing this. I love crossfit and I think I've been injured less while involved with crossfit than before. Crossfit is an amazing community of individuals who share a common love of the sport and work outs. It's not for everyone but everyone is different. It's the haters afraid of getting off the couch and participating in something bigger than themselves. They can have their couch and I'll take my deadlifts and pull ups.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/16100991571183223371 Rachel

    Oh thank you for writing this. I love crossfit and I think I've been injured less while involved with crossfit than before. Crossfit is an amazing community of individuals who share a common love of the sport and work outs. It's not for everyone but everyone is different. It's the haters afraid of getting off the couch and participating in something bigger than themselves. They can have their couch and I'll take my deadlifts and pull ups.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/16100991571183223371 Rachel

    Oh thank you for writing this. I love crossfit and I think I've been injured less while involved with crossfit than before. Crossfit is an amazing community of individuals who share a common love of the sport and work outs. It's not for everyone but everyone is different. It's the haters afraid of getting off the couch and participating in something bigger than themselves. They can have their couch and I'll take my deadlifts and pull ups.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/16100991571183223371 Rachel

    Oh thank you for writing this. I love crossfit and I think I've been injured less while involved with crossfit than before. Crossfit is an amazing community of individuals who share a common love of the sport and work outs. It's not for everyone but everyone is different. It's the haters afraid of getting off the couch and participating in something bigger than themselves. They can have their couch and I'll take my deadlifts and pull ups.

    • Anonymous

      Just have you know. Not everyone who disagrees with Crossfit, are lazy and sit on the couch. I happen to be training for a marathon. Have run 3 1/2 marathons and several other races in between. A long with working out during the week. So just as you say don't make that assumption, you should practice what you preach.

    • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01009795892121757713 Gemmabeattie84 .

      And your reason for hating crossfit is?

    • Anonymous

      I think you're wrong for lumping everyone who disagrees with some of the methods of CrossFit as haters or lazy. I'm active, train hard and i disagree with some of the culture & methods used in CrossFit…I don't hate CrossFit. Telling people who lack knowledge of the human body, what is normal discomfort & soreness as opposed to abnormal pain, don't even know how to properly listen to their bodies…if they did they would've stopped eating crappy food when they noticed they were 200lbs over weight. They need guidance not pressure & not everyone is strong enough in their mind to step away from the pressure to keep going when their body is screaming stop. One of the points of CrossFit I strongly disagree with is blaming the untrained individual for injuries endured while the trained coaches refuse accountability. I am a trainer & it is our job to keep our clients safe & healthy…because we know more about exercise & fitness than the lay person. Injuries happen but the trainer bears some responsibility. I also feel the CrossFit culture basically replaces unhealthy addictions with healthier addictions, never fixing the root problem for a lot of people. However, I agree that peeing is not uncommon in women, hell, jumping on a trampoline with your kids can cause that. I don't hate Cross Fit, I think it needs to evolve into a better program, a more responsible program…not because of injury, because they don't deal with the mind properly & wholly, which is a major part of fitness-you can get strong but maybe not fit….

    • Anonymous

      I think you're wrong for lumping everyone who disagrees with some of the methods of CrossFit as haters or lazy. I'm active, train hard and i disagree with some of the culture & methods used in CrossFit…I don't hate CrossFit. Telling people who lack knowledge of the human body, what is normal discomfort & soreness as opposed to abnormal pain, don't even know how to properly listen to their bodies…if they did they would've stopped eating crappy food when they noticed they were 200lbs over weight. They need guidance not pressure & not everyone is strong enough in their mind to step away from the pressure to keep going when their body is screaming stop. One of the points of CrossFit I strongly disagree with is blaming the untrained individual for injuries endured while the trained coaches refuse accountability. I am a trainer & it is our job to keep our clients safe & healthy…because we know more about exercise & fitness than the lay person. Injuries happen but the trainer bears some responsibility. I also feel the CrossFit culture basically replaces unhealthy addictions with healthier addictions, never fixing the root problem for a lot of people. However, I agree that peeing is not uncommon in women, hell, jumping on a trampoline with your kids can cause that. I don't hate Cross Fit, I think it needs to evolve into a better program, a more responsible program…not because of injury, because they don't deal with the mind properly & wholly, which is a major part of fitness-you can get strong but maybe not fit….

    • Anonymous

      Your contempt of overweight and inactive people is appalling as a trainer.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/16100991571183223371 Rachel

    Oh thank you for writing this. I love crossfit and I think I've been injured less while involved with crossfit than before. Crossfit is an amazing community of individuals who share a common love of the sport and work outs. It's not for everyone but everyone is different. It's the haters afraid of getting off the couch and participating in something bigger than themselves. They can have their couch and I'll take my deadlifts and pull ups.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/16100991571183223371 Rachel

    Oh thank you for writing this. I love crossfit and I think I've been injured less while involved with crossfit than before. Crossfit is an amazing community of individuals who share a common love of the sport and work outs. It's not for everyone but everyone is different. It's the haters afraid of getting off the couch and participating in something bigger than themselves. They can have their couch and I'll take my deadlifts and pull ups.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/18068768152191064275 Kat

    I am a therapist in this industry ( I am located out of CrossFit Calgary) I see this HATE every day. Hate that is maybe misdirected, definitely misunderstood, and I just wish every one who is quick to call it extreme, and ridiculous would just TRY IT! Give it a chance from a reputable Box, great coaching (who are trained for YEARS). See the good that comes out of it. The stories of those in wheelchairs directed by our surgeons, doctors, PT's, Chiro, AT's and some RMT's who don't understand CrossFit who manage to just come in and try, push and soon are walking, strengthening and not just rolling over and dying. I think this another great example of making an INFORMED decision. I should get that tattoo'd on my forehead. MAKE AN INFORMED DECISION TODAY!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/18068768152191064275 Kat

    I am a therapist in this industry ( I am located out of CrossFit Calgary) I see this HATE every day. Hate that is maybe misdirected, definitely misunderstood, and I just wish every one who is quick to call it extreme, and ridiculous would just TRY IT! Give it a chance from a reputable Box, great coaching (who are trained for YEARS). See the good that comes out of it. The stories of those in wheelchairs directed by our surgeons, doctors, PT's, Chiro, AT's and some RMT's who don't understand CrossFit who manage to just come in and try, push and soon are walking, strengthening and not just rolling over and dying. I think this another great example of making an INFORMED decision. I should get that tattoo'd on my forehead. MAKE AN INFORMED DECISION TODAY!

    • Anonymous

      I just have to say that I'm excited to see someone who knows what an AT is :) I'm one and sometimes I feel like I'm one of the only ones who doesn't think crossfit is the devil!

  • Anonymous

    dumb

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/04989322965493561395 seagull and otter

    👍😊 thanks!!! i shared it!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05057503571397129816 Stars and Wipes

    The problem with Cross-fit is that it's completely devoid of any logic. No serious athlete would ever use a routine like this in the long term, so why do average joes think it is good for them? It makes no sense, and is nothing more than a fad. It will disappear soon enough, and we will all be thankful for it because we don't have to hear people blabbing about how great it is. Cross-fit is for people who don't know how to work out for real.

  • Anonymous

    I'm a neutral 3rd party. I haven't done "official CrossFit", but I've done some extreme exercise programs. The thing that I've observed with CrossFit people is that they brag a LOT….like "I lifted 5000lbs tonight, what did you do?" …as if anyone, doing any other form of exercise is sub-par. (disclaimer: maybe i just have arrogant friends. LOL!) Also, it seems like they hang out with their "box" friends now and don't hang out with their "loser, non-exercising friends as much (see above observation)" b/c the old friends just "don't understand"…I don't get that mentality. What's to understand…you go to a gym ("box") and you have a group of people encouraging you to exercise. Pretty simple to me. So does Zumba class or Pilates class or any other class at any other gym where there is peer pressure to hold you accountable. Sure, some of the exercises seem a little crazy, but to each his own. My husband was flipping tires before it was "cool" (yes, we have a 200lb tractor tire IN our backyard…not exactly Zen for me) =). I started reading a book on Kindle called the Rules of Life….one of the first things the author says is don't brag about what you are going to do with the concepts in this book, let your life show the change, not your mouth. Maybe that is some good advise for CrossFit folks…go to your "box" do your 5000lbs worth of dead lifts or whatever that's all about and let the results speak for themselves, when your friends say "Dang! You are lookin' GOOD! What are you doing" …THEN you can brag, b/c it's being solicated ….just my 2 cents. Go forth and get healthy! =)

  • Anonymous

    dumb

  • Anonymous

    The original article isn't about hate — it's criticism, like a film critic would do. Your first paragraph already mentioned your confirmation bias: "…as soon as I saw, I clicked over to see what the latest Crossfit hater-ade was," which established your position in the author's article. Tweaking his words is an ad hominem fallacy, a tendency to misinterpret an opponent's position to suit your own perception. http://www.nizkor.org/features/fallacies/ad-hominem.htmlYou brought up some good points about personal responsibility and that there are "good" CF coaches as "bad" CF coaches, like anything in life. Both sides of the debate has its own terms and support. Then again, both sides could have a tendency to develop an "availability heuristic," which is a tendency to believe something to be common if you could find one or a few examples of it (for better or for worse), and you're far less likely to believe in something you've never seen or heard before. Keep your position objectively, support it with evidence — not anecdotes — and like someone here said, "Let your life show the change, not your mouth". Or blog or Instagrams, in most cases.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/13431340833015737497 Ryan Hadlock

    You think something that is growing in leaps and bounds over the last EIGHT years is a fad? Go back to your hole, troll.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/04989322965493561395 seagull and otter

    👍😊 thanks!!! i shared it!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/13254493351463617215 Karen

    Totally agree! The article makes it sound like it is a regular occurrence. Honestly I had only heard of it from an online article a few months ago. The thing that got me about the article was the quote about peeing – clearly it was taken out of context – the peeing is an issue with bladder control/bouncing around as you mentioned – zero to do with rhabdo.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/16682148571779265058 Monique

    I am a 50 year old woman who has had three VERY heavy babies late in life. Pee happens when I laugh, when I sneeze, heck when I hug someone too hard. Since Crossfit came into my life a year ago it has been resolving but if I have ANY pee in my bladder double unders and (since I still don't have consistent DU) single unders make pee happen.It is hard. This is the hardest thing I have physically done on a consistent basis. I am much better at doing things now than I was a year ago. Coach and I scaled things way back for my crass newby status/fitness level and have slowly ratcheted it up as I have developed correct form, strength, and endurance. I have a good coach. He listens to me. He coaches me in ways to be safe. I listen to him because I do NOT want to get hurt.There are some bad coaches out there. The first coach I went to pushed me so hard on my one and only ramp up class I was in bed for three days, barely able to function for the better part of two weeks, caused some long term injury/pain that took several months to recover from.Anyone who does something they are intensely proud of does talk about it – a lot. Your friends celebrate with you and when they have had enough gently remind you there *is* more to the world than your intense pride and remain your friends for other adventures. These are the real friends.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/03830215084158437194 Dan

    Wow, that is just pure ignorance!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/18026128234749389034 amanda

    This comment has been removed by the author.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/18026128234749389034 amanda

    I am fairly new to crossfit (four months). Its a sport, as with any other sport or hobby there are going to be lovers and haters, progressions and injuries. Every sport is not for everyone and each one comes with risk. The gym I'm at has great trainers and athletes. Safety is a primary focus then comes encouragement and progression. Upon signing up at my gym each athlete must sign a release of liability, which discusses many things one of which is rhabdomyolysis. It's not like the trainers are turning a blind eye to the risk of injury. Also when signing up the trainers ask each athlete if they have any preexisting injuries?Some athletes choose to take this to the competing level while others use it as a form of strength training for other sports. Four months later I feel fitter then I have ever felt in my life. I've always considered myself to be very active but not as fit and healthy. Not only do I feel more fit but I am now eating more healthy then I ever have because a good diet is encouraged by the athletes and trainers in crossfit. I believe this is because I want to be the best I can be in crossfit and other sports. Following healthy and fit it also mentally helps me. It allows me to focus on the WOD. No matter what mood I am in when I walk into the gym I leave feeling refreshed and happy. Crossfit has surrounded me with such an awesome and encouraging group of individuals, I consider them to be my second family. Therefore simply said for me there has been nothing but positive advancements in my life from crossfit. There are always new WODs, great athletes and knowledgeable trainers.

  • Anonymous

    Being one that has had Rhabdo, not from CF your muscles are not "exploding" and it really isn't about your irresponsibility. It is a combination of many things put together. I am not a pusher and I know my limits but it still happened. I am a nurse and have seen this many times some occasions not even from people working out.

  • Anonymous

    Sometimes I'm just proud of myself and want to share. I'm not full of myself, I've just made some significant improvements. As someone who's never been good at anything athletic, it's kind of cool to be successful at things not many of my friends do. And they seem to love that I'm doing so well, and are happy for me. Good friends are happy for you, they don't try to drag you down…..

  • Anonymous

    Stars n wipes is a dumbass

  • Anonymous

    Wow.. athletes all over are doing crossfit… nfl players.. baseball players…. actors and so on…. lol.. let me guess u lift weights at gym????

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05277327809370737424 Hannah Ashmore

    Amen!

  • Anonymous

    Well put, and same here. I'm just proud of my progress after having spent the first 20yrs of my life too afraid to get out there & get physical. I'm definitely not trying to brag. Just being passionate :)

  • Anonymous

    Excellent insights.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/14521037898848072347 Janessa Hernandez

    I jhatehow people try to claim the gym is better then a box. At the gym ill do 30 reps mx and at my box ill do as many as the wod tells me too. Ill push my hardest at my box to get a good time or even wnough rounds that git my goal for myself. At the gym you dont have a goal you go to some chest shit on machine and call it a day. At lease at my box ive achieved something great and everyone at my box will notice it too and congratulate me for my success then push me to do better next time. The gym is where no one pushes you and no one is there by your side while you succeed

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05057503571397129816 Stars and Wipes

    The problem with Cross-fit is that it's completely devoid of any logic. No serious athlete would ever use a routine like this in the long term, so why do average joes think it is good for them? It makes no sense, and is nothing more than a fad. It will disappear soon enough, and we will all be thankful for it because we don't have to hear people blabbing about how great it is. Cross-fit is for people who don't know how to work out for real.

    • http://www.blogger.com/profile/13431340833015737497 Ryan Hadlock

      You think something that is growing in leaps and bounds over the last EIGHT years is a fad? Go back to your hole, troll.

    • http://www.blogger.com/profile/03830215084158437194 Dan

      Wow, that is just pure ignorance!

    • Anonymous

      Stars n wipes is a dumbass

    • Anonymous

      Wow.. athletes all over are doing crossfit… nfl players.. baseball players…. actors and so on…. lol.. let me guess u lift weights at gym????

    • http://www.blogger.com/profile/14521037898848072347 Janessa Hernandez

      I jhatehow people try to claim the gym is better then a box. At the gym ill do 30 reps mx and at my box ill do as many as the wod tells me too. Ill push my hardest at my box to get a good time or even wnough rounds that git my goal for myself. At the gym you dont have a goal you go to some chest shit on machine and call it a day. At lease at my box ive achieved something great and everyone at my box will notice it too and congratulate me for my success then push me to do better next time. The gym is where no one pushes you and no one is there by your side while you succeed

    • http://www.blogger.com/profile/02280552779170457653 K4rm4

      Such ignorance – "use a routine like this" ??? What routine is there in CrossFit? Routine is the enemy. And calling it a fad… well Mr this "fad" is booming all the way here in South Africa and it's here to stay

    • Anonymous

      New Orlean Saints along with their head coach Sean Peyton incorporate Crossfit into their workouts. Guess they are not serious athletes though since they are currently 3-0.

    • Anonymous

      I would just like to point out that not everyone who uses a standard gym is a cupcake who goes and farts around on machines for 20 minutes then leaves. Every time I go to lift weights I know exactly what I'm doing beforehand: which exercises, how many warm-up and work sets per exercise, and number of reps per each set. This allows me to not only have short, efficient workouts but the freedom to adjust and work on lagging muscle groups or areas of weakness. If I set the bar too high, I can do some accessory workouts to improve for next workout. I also get to choose whether I workout for strength, hypertrophy, or endurance. I would say that freedom and customization are the largest pros of not doing crossfit. I will admit that I've seen more than my share of pretenders in the gym, but when you generalize everyone who uses a standard gym you're putting yourself on the same level as those who generalize crossfit people. If you don't have the capacity or willpower to stick to your goals (and if you're not setting goals, why bother?) at a regular gym then I'm super glad that crossfit works for you because fitness, however accomplished, is extremely important.

    • Anonymous

      Regarding incorporating Crossfit into their program…. Most elite athletes already do this….it's called 'conditioning training'. Nothing new here, been around long before the commercial 'Crossfit '.

    • Anonymous

      no serious athlete does crossfit? what about the most important athletes we have? the men and women who protect our freedom have had a crossfit style fitness regiment way before it blew up. I'd like to think those guys know what they are doing.

  • Anonymous

    I'm a neutral 3rd party. I haven't done "official CrossFit", but I've done some extreme exercise programs. The thing that I've observed with CrossFit people is that they brag a LOT….like "I lifted 5000lbs tonight, what did you do?" …as if anyone, doing any other form of exercise is sub-par. (disclaimer: maybe i just have arrogant friends. LOL!) Also, it seems like they hang out with their "box" friends now and don't hang out with their "loser, non-exercising friends as much (see above observation)" b/c the old friends just "don't understand"…I don't get that mentality. What's to understand…you go to a gym ("box") and you have a group of people encouraging you to exercise. Pretty simple to me. So does Zumba class or Pilates class or any other class at any other gym where there is peer pressure to hold you accountable. Sure, some of the exercises seem a little crazy, but to each his own. My husband was flipping tires before it was "cool" (yes, we have a 200lb tractor tire IN our backyard…not exactly Zen for me) =). I started reading a book on Kindle called the Rules of Life….one of the first things the author says is don't brag about what you are going to do with the concepts in this book, let your life show the change, not your mouth. Maybe that is some good advise for CrossFit folks…go to your "box" do your 5000lbs worth of dead lifts or whatever that's all about and let the results speak for themselves, when your friends say "Dang! You are lookin' GOOD! What are you doing" …THEN you can brag, b/c it's being solicated ….just my 2 cents. Go forth and get healthy! =)

    • Anonymous

      Sometimes I'm just proud of myself and want to share. I'm not full of myself, I've just made some significant improvements. As someone who's never been good at anything athletic, it's kind of cool to be successful at things not many of my friends do. And they seem to love that I'm doing so well, and are happy for me. Good friends are happy for you, they don't try to drag you down…..

    • Anonymous

      Well put, and same here. I'm just proud of my progress after having spent the first 20yrs of my life too afraid to get out there & get physical. I'm definitely not trying to brag. Just being passionate :)

    • Anonymous

      I have been saying the same thing about my friends who do crossfit for some time. They used to be normal people, but now when I run into them in the grocery store or at school pick up they not longer are able to have a normal conversation. They Never ask about my kids or my life, it is 20 minutes about a WOD or burpees. Thank you for expressing what I have been trying to say for a while!

    • Anonymous

      Q: How do you know someone does CrossFit? A: They won't shut the fuck up about it.I have been doing CrossFit for a year and a half. I've farted around with other exercise programs with mixed results. I am currently, unequivocally, in the best shape of my life. My 51-year-old self would kick my 25-year-old self's ass. That said, there are other challenging workouts. I know plenty of gym rats who are in great shape and ripped as hell. And P90X will flat wear you out – I know because I've done it. It's challenging. The thing I like about CrossFit is the community. I think that's the reason I've stuck with it longer than any exercise regimen I've ever tried. It's just fun to go at it with a bunch of your friends and get cheered on if you're the last to finish. It's fun to set a personal record. It's great to walk away from a tough workout knowing you gave everything.Is CrossFit the be-all and end-all to fitness? I don't know. I do know that because of CrossFit, I can see my abs for the first time in years. I know that my resting heart rate is 60 or under and my BP is that of a 20 year-old. I know that I feel better than I've felt in a long, long time.I'll be the first to admit some CrossFitters lean toward bravado and arrogance. But for every one of them, there is a legion of guys and gals like me who have simply found an exercise program that has produced results they've never seen before.

  • http://sexyasfuck.org/ sexyasfuck

    Tl;dr instead I did three invisible Frans and amanda with 100 kilos and a weighted vest.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/11277188324843968191 Rich

    Another classic example of a Crossfitter taking themselves way too seriously. Go drink a fucking beer, life's too short to get caught up on what one anonymous person thinks about something you think is awesome.

  • Anonymous

    The original article isn't about hate — it's criticism, like a film critic would do. Your first paragraph already mentioned your confirmation bias: "…as soon as I saw, I clicked over to see what the latest Crossfit hater-ade was," which established your position in the author's article. Tweaking his words is an ad hominem fallacy, a tendency to misinterpret an opponent's position to suit your own perception. http://www.nizkor.org/features/fallacies/ad-hominem.htmlYou brought up some good points about personal responsibility and that there are "good" CF coaches as "bad" CF coaches, like anything in life. Both sides of the debate has its own terms and support. Then again, both sides could have a tendency to develop an "availability heuristic," which is a tendency to believe something to be common if you could find one or a few examples of it (for better or for worse), and you're far less likely to believe in something you've never seen or heard before. Keep your position objectively, support it with evidence — not anecdotes — and like someone here said, "Let your life show the change, not your mouth". Or blog or Instagrams, in most cases.

    • Anonymous

      Excellent insights.

  • Anonymous

    Isn't the reason you pay the high fee to train at a 'box' is for professional coaching? The extremely high rate of injury in crossfit is because it is ran by faux-experts and programmed around crushing yourself in every WOD. The idea of periodization is scoffed at because it's not elite or ready for anything. This happens when you certify your professionals for a $1000 weekend and a t shirt.

  • Anonymous

    Isn't the reason you pay the high fee to train at a 'box' is for professional coaching? The extremely high rate of injury in crossfit is because it is ran by faux-experts and programmed around crushing yourself in every WOD. The idea of periodization is scoffed at because it's not elite or ready for anything. This happens when you certify your professionals for a $1000 weekend and a t shirt.

  • Anonymous

    I think crossfit turns people into homosexuals. Its crossfits fault people arent born that way. The holocaust didnt happen either. Thats what they taught me at my box. Santa claus is real.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/04280484793318520543 rrbaken

    THANK YOU for this article. I just despise when people hate on CrossFit. I've been more overworked (and forcefully, I might add) during college cross country practices than I ever have at CrossFit. I have a wonderful gym (Billings CrossFit) and have NEVER felt pressure to take on more than I can handle. Be smart about your lifting/workouts. Eat well. Stay hydrated. And why does CrossFit get labled as a cult anyway? Because we're a community? Because we have our own lingo for workouts? Because we enjoy hanging out with other CrossFitters? This is the same for climbers, yogis, dancers, musicians, etc. etc. etc. Any community that shares a common interests and goals automatically group themselves together.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/04280484793318520543 rrbaken

    THANK YOU for this article. I just despise when people hate on CrossFit. I've been more overworked (and forcefully, I might add) during college cross country practices than I ever have at CrossFit. I have a wonderful gym (Billings CrossFit) and have NEVER felt pressure to take on more than I can handle. Be smart about your lifting/workouts. Eat well. Stay hydrated. And why does CrossFit get labled as a cult anyway? Because we're a community? Because we have our own lingo for workouts? Because we enjoy hanging out with other CrossFitters? This is the same for climbers, yogis, dancers, musicians, etc. etc. etc. Any community that shares a common interests and goals automatically group themselves together.

  • Anonymous

    THANK YOU for this article. I've been more overworked (and forcefully, I might add) during college cross country practices than I ever have at CrossFit.

  • Anonymous

    I think the critique was valid, if a little over the top on the prognosis. It's very difficult to have a work out where you're supposed to push your limits to extremes to become elite and simultaneously be careful not to go 'tooo extreme'. They're kind of opposite ideals. That being said, all my friends who do cross seem very happy with it and don't seem to be spending their lives in the hospital.

  • Anonymous

    I did not read the Dirty Secret article as haters of Crossfit but rather of educating people about a potential health issue that could arise. Most people have not idea what Rhabdomyolysis is and it provided some basic information and what to look for. I don't believe Crossfit is an exercise evil just an alternative to getting in shape. Being educated on possible injuries is never a bad thing when a person starts or is exercising.

  • Anonymous

    I have been saying the same thing about my friends who do crossfit for some time. They used to be normal people, but now when I run into them in the grocery store or at school pick up they not longer are able to have a normal conversation. They Never ask about my kids or my life, it is 20 minutes about a WOD or burpees. Thank you for expressing what I have been trying to say for a while!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/13254493351463617215 Karen

    Totally agree! The article makes it sound like it is a regular occurrence. Honestly I had only heard of it from an online article a few months ago. The thing that got me about the article was the quote about peeing – clearly it was taken out of context – the peeing is an issue with bladder control/bouncing around as you mentioned – zero to do with rhabdo.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/16682148571779265058 Monique

    I am a 50 year old woman who has had three VERY heavy babies late in life. Pee happens when I laugh, when I sneeze, heck when I hug someone too hard. Since Crossfit came into my life a year ago it has been resolving but if I have ANY pee in my bladder double unders and (since I still don't have consistent DU) single unders make pee happen.It is hard. This is the hardest thing I have physically done on a consistent basis. I am much better at doing things now than I was a year ago. Coach and I scaled things way back for my crass newby status/fitness level and have slowly ratcheted it up as I have developed correct form, strength, and endurance. I have a good coach. He listens to me. He coaches me in ways to be safe. I listen to him because I do NOT want to get hurt.There are some bad coaches out there. The first coach I went to pushed me so hard on my one and only ramp up class I was in bed for three days, barely able to function for the better part of two weeks, caused some long term injury/pain that took several months to recover from.Anyone who does something they are intensely proud of does talk about it – a lot. Your friends celebrate with you and when they have had enough gently remind you there *is* more to the world than your intense pride and remain your friends for other adventures. These are the real friends.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/18026128234749389034 amanda

    This comment has been removed by the author.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/18026128234749389034 amanda

    I am fairly new to crossfit (four months). Its a sport, as with any other sport or hobby there are going to be lovers and haters, progressions and injuries. Every sport is not for everyone and each one comes with risk. The gym I'm at has great trainers and athletes. Safety is a primary focus then comes encouragement and progression. Upon signing up at my gym each athlete must sign a release of liability, which discusses many things one of which is rhabdomyolysis. It's not like the trainers are turning a blind eye to the risk of injury. Also when signing up the trainers ask each athlete if they have any preexisting injuries?Some athletes choose to take this to the competing level while others use it as a form of strength training for other sports. Four months later I feel fitter then I have ever felt in my life. I've always considered myself to be very active but not as fit and healthy. Not only do I feel more fit but I am now eating more healthy then I ever have because a good diet is encouraged by the athletes and trainers in crossfit. I believe this is because I want to be the best I can be in crossfit and other sports. Following healthy and fit it also mentally helps me. It allows me to focus on the WOD. No matter what mood I am in when I walk into the gym I leave feeling refreshed and happy. Crossfit has surrounded me with such an awesome and encouraging group of individuals, I consider them to be my second family. Therefore simply said for me there has been nothing but positive advancements in my life from crossfit. There are always new WODs, great athletes and knowledgeable trainers.

  • Anonymous

    Being one that has had Rhabdo, not from CF your muscles are not "exploding" and it really isn't about your irresponsibility. It is a combination of many things put together. I am not a pusher and I know my limits but it still happened. I am a nurse and have seen this many times some occasions not even from people working out.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05277327809370737424 Hannah Ashmore

    Amen!

  • Anonymous

    My sentimrnts exactly

  • http://sexyasfuck.org/ sexyasfuck

    Tl;dr instead I did three invisible Frans and amanda with 100 kilos and a weighted vest.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/11277188324843968191 Rich

    Another classic example of a Crossfitter taking themselves way too seriously. Go drink a fucking beer, life's too short to get caught up on what one anonymous person thinks about something you think is awesome.

  • Anonymous

    I just have to say that I'm excited to see someone who knows what an AT is :) I'm one and sometimes I feel like I'm one of the only ones who doesn't think crossfit is the devil!

  • Anonymous

    Isn't the reason you pay the high fee to train at a 'box' is for professional coaching? The extremely high rate of injury in crossfit is because it is ran by faux-experts and programmed around crushing yourself in every WOD. The idea of periodization is scoffed at because it's not elite or ready for anything. This happens when you certify your professionals for a $1000 weekend and a t shirt.

    • Anonymous

      My sentimrnts exactly

  • Anonymous

    Isn't the reason you pay the high fee to train at a 'box' is for professional coaching? The extremely high rate of injury in crossfit is because it is ran by faux-experts and programmed around crushing yourself in every WOD. The idea of periodization is scoffed at because it's not elite or ready for anything. This happens when you certify your professionals for a $1000 weekend and a t shirt.

  • Anonymous

    I think crossfit turns people into homosexuals. Its crossfits fault people arent born that way. The holocaust didnt happen either. Thats what they taught me at my box. Santa claus is real.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/04280484793318520543 rrbaken

    THANK YOU for this article. I just despise when people hate on CrossFit. I've been more overworked (and forcefully, I might add) during college cross country practices than I ever have at CrossFit. I have a wonderful gym (Billings CrossFit) and have NEVER felt pressure to take on more than I can handle. Be smart about your lifting/workouts. Eat well. Stay hydrated. And why does CrossFit get labled as a cult anyway? Because we're a community? Because we have our own lingo for workouts? Because we enjoy hanging out with other CrossFitters? This is the same for climbers, yogis, dancers, musicians, etc. etc. etc. Any community that shares a common interests and goals automatically group themselves together.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/04280484793318520543 rrbaken

    THANK YOU for this article. I just despise when people hate on CrossFit. I've been more overworked (and forcefully, I might add) during college cross country practices than I ever have at CrossFit. I have a wonderful gym (Billings CrossFit) and have NEVER felt pressure to take on more than I can handle. Be smart about your lifting/workouts. Eat well. Stay hydrated. And why does CrossFit get labled as a cult anyway? Because we're a community? Because we have our own lingo for workouts? Because we enjoy hanging out with other CrossFitters? This is the same for climbers, yogis, dancers, musicians, etc. etc. etc. Any community that shares a common interests and goals automatically group themselves together.

  • Anonymous

    THANK YOU for this article. I've been more overworked (and forcefully, I might add) during college cross country practices than I ever have at CrossFit.

  • Anonymous

    I think the critique was valid, if a little over the top on the prognosis. It's very difficult to have a work out where you're supposed to push your limits to extremes to become elite and simultaneously be careful not to go 'tooo extreme'. They're kind of opposite ideals. That being said, all my friends who do cross seem very happy with it and don't seem to be spending their lives in the hospital.

  • Anonymous

    I did not read the Dirty Secret article as haters of Crossfit but rather of educating people about a potential health issue that could arise. Most people have not idea what Rhabdomyolysis is and it provided some basic information and what to look for. I don't believe Crossfit is an exercise evil just an alternative to getting in shape. Being educated on possible injuries is never a bad thing when a person starts or is exercising.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/02280552779170457653 K4rm4

    Such ignorance – "use a routine like this" ??? What routine is there in CrossFit? Routine is the enemy. And calling it a fad… well Mr this "fad" is booming all the way here in South Africa and it's here to stay

  • Anonymous

    the thing i dont understand is. You say you have coaches. Arent coaches suppose to show you the correct way to lift and the correct amount of weight to use? So if that happens "crossfitters" shouldnt really put themselves in danger and exercise to an extreme where they are injured. If thats the case just open a "box" get your certification and be done with it.

  • Diane. CFHO

    I have been crossfitting for about year and half. I am proud to be part of the crossfit community and my cf family. I have been working out in gyms almost my whole life andgot bored . Doing cf has brought out my love of exercise again plus the great people I call friends. I hear all time how we are part of a cult. But haters are haters and can say a lot from the couch. All I will say is you can hurt yourself from sneezing. Everyone wants to play blame game. I say take accountability for your own actions. My coach would never educate our members safely!!

  • diane

    Coach!!! Silly me

  • Anonymous

    Just have you know. Not everyone who disagrees with Crossfit, are lazy and sit on the couch. I happen to be training for a marathon. Have run 3 1/2 marathons and several other races in between. A long with working out during the week. So just as you say don't make that assumption, you should practice what you preach.

  • Anonymous

    the thing i dont understand is. You say you have coaches. Arent coaches suppose to show you the correct way to lift and the correct amount of weight to use? So if that happens "crossfitters" shouldnt really put themselves in danger and exercise to an extreme where they are injured. If thats the case just open a "box" get your certification and be done with it.

  • Diane. CFHO

    I have been crossfitting for about year and half. I am proud to be part of the crossfit community and my cf family. I have been working out in gyms almost my whole life andgot bored . Doing cf has brought out my love of exercise again plus the great people I call friends. I hear all time how we are part of a cult. But haters are haters and can say a lot from the couch. All I will say is you can hurt yourself from sneezing. Everyone wants to play blame game. I say take accountability for your own actions. My coach would never educate our members safely!!

    • diane

      Coach!!! Silly me

  • Anonymous

    New Orlean Saints along with their head coach Sean Peyton incorporate Crossfit into their workouts. Guess they are not serious athletes though since they are currently 3-0.

  • Anonymous

    The problem I had with the Dirty little secrete was that a physical therapist was too dumb to realize what was going on with her muscles and did not seek help for 24 hours. That in its self tells me she is not to smart. Anytime you have an article that is so slanted and full of emoticons and little facts it makes you question the quality of the article.

  • Anonymous

    I would just like to point out that not everyone who uses a standard gym is a cupcake who goes and farts around on machines for 20 minutes then leaves. Every time I go to lift weights I know exactly what I'm doing beforehand: which exercises, how many warm-up and work sets per exercise, and number of reps per each set. This allows me to not only have short, efficient workouts but the freedom to adjust and work on lagging muscle groups or areas of weakness. If I set the bar too high, I can do some accessory workouts to improve for next workout. I also get to choose whether I workout for strength, hypertrophy, or endurance. I would say that freedom and customization are the largest pros of not doing crossfit. I will admit that I've seen more than my share of pretenders in the gym, but when you generalize everyone who uses a standard gym you're putting yourself on the same level as those who generalize crossfit people. If you don't have the capacity or willpower to stick to your goals (and if you're not setting goals, why bother?) at a regular gym then I'm super glad that crossfit works for you because fitness, however accomplished, is extremely important.

  • Anonymous

    Q: How do you know someone does CrossFit? A: They won't shut the fuck up about it.I have been doing CrossFit for a year and a half. I've farted around with other exercise programs with mixed results. I am currently, unequivocally, in the best shape of my life. My 51-year-old self would kick my 25-year-old self's ass. That said, there are other challenging workouts. I know plenty of gym rats who are in great shape and ripped as hell. And P90X will flat wear you out – I know because I've done it. It's challenging. The thing I like about CrossFit is the community. I think that's the reason I've stuck with it longer than any exercise regimen I've ever tried. It's just fun to go at it with a bunch of your friends and get cheered on if you're the last to finish. It's fun to set a personal record. It's great to walk away from a tough workout knowing you gave everything.Is CrossFit the be-all and end-all to fitness? I don't know. I do know that because of CrossFit, I can see my abs for the first time in years. I know that my resting heart rate is 60 or under and my BP is that of a 20 year-old. I know that I feel better than I've felt in a long, long time.I'll be the first to admit some CrossFitters lean toward bravado and arrogance. But for every one of them, there is a legion of guys and gals like me who have simply found an exercise program that has produced results they've never seen before.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/11291827067995417827 Rikki3080

    It seems pretty obvious to me that both articles are full of bias regarding each author's opinions about CF. I have several friends who go to a box and push themselves on a regular basis, and to varying degrees, they've all achieved better levels of health and stamina. None of them have seriously injured themselves that I know of, and one continued her CF (modified where needed) through several months of her last pregnancy. Here is the thing, though: If it works for you, great. If you feel good about yourself and you're being careful and healthy (or not, if that's your choice), then awesome for you. Personally, I do Krav Maga and I love it, despite the fact that I've gone home feeling like my muscles are made of jello and I continually find new bruises I have no idea how or when I received. I have friends and colleagues who think it's ridiculous and unsafe to pay my own good money to go to a place where other people punch and kick at you and you generally get the crap beaten out of you in the process. Amazingly, however, my first reaction is not, "Oh god, it makes me so MAD that some people don't like my workout!! I must tell the world it's awesome and educate those ignorant haters!!" If your pride in your workout is such that you cannot STAND the thought that other people don't like it, or think it's unsafe, or have the audacity to write an article about their negative opinions, perhaps that in itself is rather telling. I'm sorry to break this to you, but there are people (most of whom have never actually tried crossfit themselves) who are going to think that your version of fitness is stupid, or irresponsible, or dangerous. People can hurt themselves doing yoga if they're not careful or use poor technique, and I try to give most people credit for being rational enough to understand this. Do what you love, and use your common sense. If a coach wants you to do something that you KNOW is too much, then perhaps it's not the right spot or the right coach for you. But perhaps folks could lighten up and realize that not everyone is addicted to, or even appreciates, crossfit. Some people will say negative things about it… publicly! *Gasp!* My own husband thinks my workout of choice is sort of dumb. I don't call him a hater… I just don't invite him to come with me to class. …just sayin.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/11291827067995417827 Rikki3080

    It seems pretty obvious to me that both articles are full of bias regarding each author's opinions about CF. I have several friends who go to a box and push themselves on a regular basis, and to varying degrees, they've all achieved better levels of health and stamina. None of them have seriously injured themselves that I know of, and one continued her CF (modified where needed) through several months of her last pregnancy. Here is the thing, though: If it works for you, great. If you feel good about yourself and you're being careful and healthy (or not, if that's your choice), then awesome for you. Personally, I do Krav Maga and I love it, despite the fact that I've gone home feeling like my muscles are made of jello and I continually find new bruises I have no idea how or when I received. I have friends and colleagues who think it's ridiculous and unsafe to pay my own good money to go to a place where other people punch and kick at you and you generally get the crap beaten out of you in the process. Amazingly, however, my first reaction is not, "Oh god, it makes me so MAD that some people don't like my workout!! I must tell the world it's awesome and educate those ignorant haters!!" If your pride in your workout is such that you cannot STAND the thought that other people don't like it, or think it's unsafe, or have the audacity to write an article about their negative opinions, perhaps that in itself is rather telling. I'm sorry to break this to you, but there are people (most of whom have never actually tried crossfit themselves) who are going to think that your version of fitness is stupid, or irresponsible, or dangerous. People can hurt themselves doing yoga if they're not careful or use poor technique, and I try to give most people credit for being rational enough to understand this. Do what you love, and use your common sense. If a coach wants you to do something that you KNOW is too much, then perhaps it's not the right spot or the right coach for you. But perhaps folks could lighten up and realize that not everyone is addicted to, or even appreciates, crossfit. Some people will say negative things about it… publicly! *Gasp!* My own husband thinks my workout of choice is sort of dumb. I don't call him a hater… I just don't invite him to come with me to class. …just sayin.

  • Anonymous

    The problem I had with the Dirty little secrete was that a physical therapist was too dumb to realize what was going on with her muscles and did not seek help for 24 hours. That in its self tells me she is not to smart. Anytime you have an article that is so slanted and full of emoticons and little facts it makes you question the quality of the article.

  • Anonymous

    Risk factors include the following:•Alcoholism (with muscle tremors)•Crush injuries•Drugs, especially cocaine, amphetamines, statins, heroin, or PCP•Genetic muscle diseases•Heatstroke•Ischemia or necrosis of the muscles (which may occur with arterial occlusion, deep venous thrombosis, or other conditions)•Low phosphate levels•Seizures•Severe exertion, such as marathon running or calisthenics•Shaking chills•Trauma

  • Anonymous

    I love crossfit. I've been doing it for more than two years.I gain friendd in my gym.love them.. a freind of mine posted an article about dis advantage of to much.and one of a friend mis understood it.and they call him crossfit hater.he does crossfit too.its just a warning to everyone that toooo much is not good for your health .anyways its your body, your life, your business. we love crossfit ….enjoy it.life is to short.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/11291827067995417827 Rikki3080

    It seems pretty obvious to me that both articles are full of bias regarding each author's opinions about CF. I have several friends who go to a box and push themselves on a regular basis, and to varying degrees, they've all achieved better levels of health and stamina. None of them have seriously injured themselves that I know of, and one continued her CF (modified where needed) through several months of her last pregnancy. Here is the thing, though: If it works for you, great. If you feel good about yourself and you're being careful and healthy (or not, if that's your choice), then awesome for you. Personally, I do Krav Maga and I love it, despite the fact that I've gone home feeling like my muscles are made of jello and I continually find new bruises I have no idea how or when I received. I have friends and colleagues who think it's ridiculous and unsafe to pay my own good money to go to a place where other people punch and kick at you and you generally get the crap beaten out of you in the process. Amazingly, however, my first reaction is not, "Oh god, it makes me so MAD that some people don't like my workout!! I must tell the world it's awesome and educate those ignorant haters!!" If your pride in your workout is such that you cannot STAND the thought that other people don't like it, or think it's unsafe, or have the audacity to write an article about their negative opinions, perhaps that in itself is rather telling. I'm sorry to break this to you, but there are people (most of whom have never actually tried crossfit themselves) who are going to think that your version of fitness is stupid, or irresponsible, or dangerous. People can hurt themselves doing yoga if they're not careful or use poor technique, and I try to give most people credit for being rational enough to understand this. Do what you love, and use your common sense. If a coach wants you to do something that you KNOW is too much, then perhaps it's not the right spot or the right coach for you. But perhaps folks could lighten up and realize that not everyone is addicted to, or even appreciates, crossfit. Some people will say negative things about it… publicly! *Gasp!* My own husband thinks my workout of choice is sort of dumb. I don't call him a hater… I just don't invite him to come with me to class. …just sayin.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/11291827067995417827 Rikki3080

    It seems pretty obvious to me that both articles are full of bias regarding each author's opinions about CF. I have several friends who go to a box and push themselves on a regular basis, and to varying degrees, they've all achieved better levels of health and stamina. None of them have seriously injured themselves that I know of, and one continued her CF (modified where needed) through several months of her last pregnancy. Here is the thing, though: If it works for you, great. If you feel good about yourself and you're being careful and healthy (or not, if that's your choice), then awesome for you. Personally, I do Krav Maga and I love it, despite the fact that I've gone home feeling like my muscles are made of jello and I continually find new bruises I have no idea how or when I received. I have friends and colleagues who think it's ridiculous and unsafe to pay my own good money to go to a place where other people punch and kick at you and you generally get the crap beaten out of you in the process. Amazingly, however, my first reaction is not, "Oh god, it makes me so MAD that some people don't like my workout!! I must tell the world it's awesome and educate those ignorant haters!!" If your pride in your workout is such that you cannot STAND the thought that other people don't like it, or think it's unsafe, or have the audacity to write an article about their negative opinions, perhaps that in itself is rather telling. I'm sorry to break this to you, but there are people (most of whom have never actually tried crossfit themselves) who are going to think that your version of fitness is stupid, or irresponsible, or dangerous. People can hurt themselves doing yoga if they're not careful or use poor technique, and I try to give most people credit for being rational enough to understand this. Do what you love, and use your common sense. If a coach wants you to do something that you KNOW is too much, then perhaps it's not the right spot or the right coach for you. But perhaps folks could lighten up and realize that not everyone is addicted to, or even appreciates, crossfit. Some people will say negative things about it… publicly! *Gasp!* My own husband thinks my workout of choice is sort of dumb. I don't call him a hater… I just don't invite him to come with me to class. …just sayin.

  • Anonymous

    i like what you write and totally agree.your life your body your business and yours to enjoy any form of fittness crossfit or others, that suits you and the fact that you have the freedom to choose, in itself is soo powerful.healthy body healthy mind and there are too many issues ,to be wasting time on these little aspects.and like u say life is short—–!

  • Anonymous

    Risk factors include the following:•Alcoholism (with muscle tremors)•Crush injuries•Drugs, especially cocaine, amphetamines, statins, heroin, or PCP•Genetic muscle diseases•Heatstroke•Ischemia or necrosis of the muscles (which may occur with arterial occlusion, deep venous thrombosis, or other conditions)•Low phosphate levels•Seizures•Severe exertion, such as marathon running or calisthenics•Shaking chills•Trauma

  • Anonymous

    I love crossfit. I've been doing it for more than two years.I gain friendd in my gym.love them.. a freind of mine posted an article about dis advantage of to much.and one of a friend mis understood it.and they call him crossfit hater.he does crossfit too.its just a warning to everyone that toooo much is not good for your health .anyways its your body, your life, your business. we love crossfit ….enjoy it.life is to short.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01009795892121757713 Gemmabeattie84 .

    And your reason for hating crossfit is?

  • Anonymous

    i like what you write and totally agree.your life your body your business and yours to enjoy any form of fittness crossfit or others, that suits you and the fact that you have the freedom to choose, in itself is soo powerful.healthy body healthy mind and there are too many issues ,to be wasting time on these little aspects.and like u say life is short—–!

  • http://strycat.wordpress.com/ strycat

    I don't know about other Crossfits but the one I go to the coaches are always watching to make sure you're doing everything with proper form. If you can't do the entire set with proper form, they have you drop the weight back on the next set. When it comes to the named workouts, about half our gym can't do the prescribed weights and the coaches see that we adjust the weight down enough to make it through. While the coaches and everyone in the gym encourages you to do more everyone is also supportive when you say no I need to lift less. I use to have a membership at the Y, then I moved to AmFam, and finally I worked for a large place that provided a gym. At all three you saw the trainer the first day, got a whirlwind tour of the place, and then didn't see a trainer again unless you shelled out some money. After a while of not really knowing what I was doing and not seeing any results I'd cough up the money for the trainer. I got the same type of person at all three places. They looked like a "naturally" skinny person, but probably didn't work out more than running a few miles on the treadmill every 2 or 3 days. They would only show you how to use the machines and never really encourage you to push yourself. At the corporate gym I went 3 months of seeing the trainer weekly. Only one of his workouts ever caused me to break a sweat. The other times during the week when I didn't see the trainer, I did break a sweat but never knew if I was really doing the movement right or if it was really helping. I certainly saw only a little improvement during my regular gym days.Then I found crossfit. I've been going less than a year and I already see a huge improvement. I feel a lot stronger than I did when I started (and can already lift a lot more). I've gained about 15 lbs but my pants now hang loose (I use to not wear a belt and my pants were very snug, now my pants actually fall off if I don't have the belt cinched up tight). Finally I actually feel healthy like I did when I was in my 20s. I personally think the hate directed towards Crossfit is because of its contrarian and libertarian views (http://washingtonexaminer.com/article/2536381). The haters of Crossfit seem to be the kind of person who hates anyone who exercises any kind of independence, personal responsibility, or rational thought. IMHO, it is no coincidence the hate article was on HuffPo.

  • http://strycat.wordpress.com/ strycat

    I don't know about other Crossfits but the one I go to the coaches are always watching to make sure you're doing everything with proper form. If you can't do the entire set with proper form, they have you drop the weight back on the next set. When it comes to the named workouts, about half our gym can't do the prescribed weights and the coaches see that we adjust the weight down enough to make it through. While the coaches and everyone in the gym encourages you to do more everyone is also supportive when you say no I need to lift less. I use to have a membership at the Y, then I moved to AmFam, and finally I worked for a large place that provided a gym. At all three you saw the trainer the first day, got a whirlwind tour of the place, and then didn't see a trainer again unless you shelled out some money. After a while of not really knowing what I was doing and not seeing any results I'd cough up the money for the trainer. I got the same type of person at all three places. They looked like a "naturally" skinny person, but probably didn't work out more than running a few miles on the treadmill every 2 or 3 days. They would only show you how to use the machines and never really encourage you to push yourself. At the corporate gym I went 3 months of seeing the trainer weekly. Only one of his workouts ever caused me to break a sweat. The other times during the week when I didn't see the trainer, I did break a sweat but never knew if I was really doing the movement right or if it was really helping. I certainly saw only a little improvement during my regular gym days.Then I found crossfit. I've been going less than a year and I already see a huge improvement. I feel a lot stronger than I did when I started (and can already lift a lot more). I've gained about 15 lbs but my pants now hang loose (I use to not wear a belt and my pants were very snug, now my pants actually fall off if I don't have the belt cinched up tight). Finally I actually feel healthy like I did when I was in my 20s. I personally think the hate directed towards Crossfit is because of its contrarian and libertarian views (http://washingtonexaminer.com/article/2536381). The haters of Crossfit seem to be the kind of person who hates anyone who exercises any kind of independence, personal responsibility, or rational thought. IMHO, it is no coincidence the hate article was on HuffPo.

  • Anonymous

    I think you're wrong for lumping everyone who disagrees with some of the methods of CrossFit as haters or lazy. I'm active, train hard and i disagree with some of the culture & methods used in CrossFit…I don't hate CrossFit. Telling people who lack knowledge of the human body, what is normal discomfort & soreness as opposed to abnormal pain, don't even know how to properly listen to their bodies…if they did they would've stopped eating crappy food when they noticed they were 200lbs over weight. They need guidance not pressure & not everyone is strong enough in their mind to step away from the pressure to keep going when their body is screaming stop. One of the points of CrossFit I strongly disagree with is blaming the untrained individual for injuries endured while the trained coaches refuse accountability. I am a trainer & it is our job to keep our clients safe & healthy…because we know more about exercise & fitness than the lay person. Injuries happen but the trainer bears some responsibility. I also feel the CrossFit culture basically replaces unhealthy addictions with healthier addictions, never fixing the root problem for a lot of people. However, I agree that peeing is not uncommon in women, hell, jumping on a trampoline with your kids can cause that. I don't hate Cross Fit, I think it needs to evolve into a better program, a more responsible program…not because of injury, because they don't deal with the mind properly & wholly, which is a major part of fitness-you can get strong but maybe not fit….

  • Anonymous

    I think you're wrong for lumping everyone who disagrees with some of the methods of CrossFit as haters or lazy. I'm active, train hard and i disagree with some of the culture & methods used in CrossFit…I don't hate CrossFit. Telling people who lack knowledge of the human body, what is normal discomfort & soreness as opposed to abnormal pain, don't even know how to properly listen to their bodies…if they did they would've stopped eating crappy food when they noticed they were 200lbs over weight. They need guidance not pressure & not everyone is strong enough in their mind to step away from the pressure to keep going when their body is screaming stop. One of the points of CrossFit I strongly disagree with is blaming the untrained individual for injuries endured while the trained coaches refuse accountability. I am a trainer & it is our job to keep our clients safe & healthy…because we know more about exercise & fitness than the lay person. Injuries happen but the trainer bears some responsibility. I also feel the CrossFit culture basically replaces unhealthy addictions with healthier addictions, never fixing the root problem for a lot of people. However, I agree that peeing is not uncommon in women, hell, jumping on a trampoline with your kids can cause that. I don't hate Cross Fit, I think it needs to evolve into a better program, a more responsible program…not because of injury, because they don't deal with the mind properly & wholly, which is a major part of fitness-you can get strong but maybe not fit….

  • Anonymous

    I applaud anyone seeking athletic improvement but I have to say that most of my CF friends have become fanatical about it. It's like a cult and it is all they talk about, post about and that is really annoying. Do the work and shut up about it

  • http://strycat.wordpress.com/ strycat

    I don't know about other Crossfits but the one I go to the coaches are always watching to make sure you're doing everything with proper form. If you can't do the entire set with proper form, they have you drop the weight back on the next set. When it comes to the named workouts, about half our gym can't do the prescribed weights and the coaches see that we adjust the weight down enough to make it through. While the coaches and everyone in the gym encourages you to do more everyone is also supportive when you say no I need to lift less. I use to have a membership at the Y, then I moved to AmFam, and finally I worked for a large place that provided a gym. At all three you saw the trainer the first day, got a whirlwind tour of the place, and then didn't see a trainer again unless you shelled out some money. After a while of not really knowing what I was doing and not seeing any results I'd cough up the money for the trainer. I got the same type of person at all three places. They looked like a "naturally" skinny person, but probably didn't work out more than running a few miles on the treadmill every 2 or 3 days. They would only show you how to use the machines and never really encourage you to push yourself. At the corporate gym I went 3 months of seeing the trainer weekly. Only one of his workouts ever caused me to break a sweat. The other times during the week when I didn't see the trainer, I did break a sweat but never knew if I was really doing the movement right or if it was really helping. I certainly saw only a little improvement during my regular gym days.Then I found crossfit. I've been going less than a year and I already see a huge improvement. I feel a lot stronger than I did when I started (and can already lift a lot more). I've gained about 15 lbs but my pants now hang loose (I use to not wear a belt and my pants were very snug, now my pants actually fall off if I don't have the belt cinched up tight). Finally I actually feel healthy like I did when I was in my 20s. I personally think the hate directed towards Crossfit is because of its contrarian and libertarian views (http://washingtonexaminer.com/article/2536381). The haters of Crossfit seem to be the kind of person who hates anyone who exercises any kind of independence, personal responsibility, or rational thought. IMHO, it is no coincidence the hate article was on HuffPo.

  • http://strycat.wordpress.com/ strycat

    I don't know about other Crossfits but the one I go to the coaches are always watching to make sure you're doing everything with proper form. If you can't do the entire set with proper form, they have you drop the weight back on the next set. When it comes to the named workouts, about half our gym can't do the prescribed weights and the coaches see that we adjust the weight down enough to make it through. While the coaches and everyone in the gym encourages you to do more everyone is also supportive when you say no I need to lift less. I use to have a membership at the Y, then I moved to AmFam, and finally I worked for a large place that provided a gym. At all three you saw the trainer the first day, got a whirlwind tour of the place, and then didn't see a trainer again unless you shelled out some money. After a while of not really knowing what I was doing and not seeing any results I'd cough up the money for the trainer. I got the same type of person at all three places. They looked like a "naturally" skinny person, but probably didn't work out more than running a few miles on the treadmill every 2 or 3 days. They would only show you how to use the machines and never really encourage you to push yourself. At the corporate gym I went 3 months of seeing the trainer weekly. Only one of his workouts ever caused me to break a sweat. The other times during the week when I didn't see the trainer, I did break a sweat but never knew if I was really doing the movement right or if it was really helping. I certainly saw only a little improvement during my regular gym days.Then I found crossfit. I've been going less than a year and I already see a huge improvement. I feel a lot stronger than I did when I started (and can already lift a lot more). I've gained about 15 lbs but my pants now hang loose (I use to not wear a belt and my pants were very snug, now my pants actually fall off if I don't have the belt cinched up tight). Finally I actually feel healthy like I did when I was in my 20s. I personally think the hate directed towards Crossfit is because of its contrarian and libertarian views (http://washingtonexaminer.com/article/2536381). The haters of Crossfit seem to be the kind of person who hates anyone who exercises any kind of independence, personal responsibility, or rational thought. IMHO, it is no coincidence the hate article was on HuffPo.

  • Anonymous

    Why shut up about it? The gains in CF are fast and measurable. Are the comments annoying because your CF friends have gains that you have not experienced? If so, I'd recommend you give it a try; you might like the results. If not, suit yourself. Just be happy that your friends are getting healthy, fit, and strong, regardless of the method they are using. And yes, strong enough quickly enough to be proud.

  • Anonymous

    Your contempt of overweight and inactive people is appalling as a trainer.

  • Anonymous

    I applaud anyone seeking athletic improvement but I have to say that most of my CF friends have become fanatical about it. It's like a cult and it is all they talk about, post about and that is really annoying. Do the work and shut up about it

    • Anonymous

      Why shut up about it? The gains in CF are fast and measurable. Are the comments annoying because your CF friends have gains that you have not experienced? If so, I'd recommend you give it a try; you might like the results. If not, suit yourself. Just be happy that your friends are getting healthy, fit, and strong, regardless of the method they are using. And yes, strong enough quickly enough to be proud.

  • Anonymous

    Regarding incorporating Crossfit into their program…. Most elite athletes already do this….it's called 'conditioning training'. Nothing new here, been around long before the commercial 'Crossfit '.

  • Anonymous

    no serious athlete does crossfit? what about the most important athletes we have? the men and women who protect our freedom have had a crossfit style fitness regiment way before it blew up. I'd like to think those guys know what they are doing.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/11472021329924842927 Mittar Khalsa

    I used to run track in high school and I'd hurt myself straining muscles. Then I did Karate for years and I'd sprain ankles, break toes, jam fingers, etc. Workout out at the gym, I'd pull muscles, and tweak knees etc. Injury is a part of fitness, it can be minimized, but to expect it to be eliminated is just naive.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/11472021329924842927 Mittar Khalsa

    I used to run track in high school and I'd hurt myself straining muscles. Then I did Karate for years and I'd sprain ankles, break toes, jam fingers, etc. Workout out at the gym, I'd pull muscles, and tweak knees etc. Injury is a part of fitness, it can be minimized, but to expect it to be eliminated is just naive.

  • Anonymous

    how about people just enjoying something that makes them feel good everyday, about themselves, about their life, spreading that to the people around them. I have been a fitness professional for 20 years and have seen many fads. The ones that have stuck are the basics- weights, fitness classes, yoga, cycling to name a few.enjoy your time on this planet and do what makes you feel good be it supervised in a gym, on the trail, on the pavement, in a boat, on the ski hill. Share your love of your sport to inspire others to move! What works for you may not work for your neighbor…………let's just enjoy movement and allow our quality of health to keep our world positive.

  • Anonymous

    how about people just enjoying something that makes them feel good everyday, about themselves, about their life, spreading that to the people around them. I have been a fitness professional for 20 years and have seen many fads. The ones that have stuck are the basics- weights, fitness classes, yoga, cycling to name a few.enjoy your time on this planet and do what makes you feel good be it supervised in a gym, on the trail, on the pavement, in a boat, on the ski hill. Share your love of your sport to inspire others to move! What works for you may not work for your neighbor…………let's just enjoy movement and allow our quality of health to keep our world positive.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01819914309622284051 TLR

    I'm not gonna point any fingers here but I have seen people get rhabdo doing Crossfit certainly through no fault of there own. Nor was it the trainers as they took away weight and scaled the reps down to a near beginner level. The person that got rhabdo was not a beginner and was not going very hard at all. He was not pushed. It just happened and it does. The risk exists and when we push and go fast it increases. Simply the nature of things. Does that make CrossFit Risky? That is up to the educated individual to decide. Is Crossfit to blame? Again that is up to the educated individual

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01819914309622284051 TLR

    I'm not gonna point any fingers here but I have seen people get rhabdo doing Crossfit certainly through no fault of there own. Nor was it the trainers as they took away weight and scaled the reps down to a near beginner level. The person that got rhabdo was not a beginner and was not going very hard at all. He was not pushed. It just happened and it does. The risk exists and when we push and go fast it increases. Simply the nature of things. Does that make CrossFit Risky? That is up to the educated individual to decide. Is Crossfit to blame? Again that is up to the educated individual

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